Archive for the ‘time server’ Category

Just How Do NTP Time Servers Deal with Daylight Savings Time Changeovers?

Monday, January 30th, 2017

NTP Time Servers

What is NTP time? How is NTP maintained? What is Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)? Will daylight savings time affect how NTP time servers work? Find answers to commonly asked questions about NTP using this FAQ guide…

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Why Should Schools Have a Network Time Server?

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015

Network Time Server

Schools are increasingly being targeted by DDoS attacks [Distributed Denial of Service] to the point where access to the internet or computer resources is completely restricted.

How can schools combat this growing problem? A network time server could help to ease attacks.

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4 Simple Steps to Ping Your NTP Time Server

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

Are your NTP servers online? If your clocks are failing to update correctly across your network, it’s possible that your NTP server is down. You can ping your NTP time server in 4 simple steps to check its status. Here’s how…

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Additional Leap Second in June: Will it Cause Problems?

Monday, March 9th, 2015

The Paris Observatory has announced an additional leap second will be added to clocks in June 2015. What does this mean for businesses? Galleon Systems examines.

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What Is NTP? What Are Its Benefits? Find Out Now…

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

NTP time server specialists, Galleon, answers what is NTP? Highlighting the benefits of NTP servers for businesses.    

What Is NTP?

What Is NTP?

Galleon Systems, Provider Of NTP Time Servers

In simple terms NTP, or Network Time Protocol, is a system used to synchronise the time of day across computer networks. Originally developed by David L. Mills of the University of Delaware, NTP works by using a single time source, enabling it to synchronise time across all devices that are part of a network.

Did you know? NTP was first implemented in 1985. However, some of its predecessors date back as far as 1979.

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NTP Time Servers – Are They Affected By Daylight Savings Time?

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014
Daylight Savings, NTP Time Server

Clocks go forward on March 30, 2014.

Specialists in the design, manufacture and supply of time synchronisation units and digital clocks, Galleon Systems clears up the confusion over the impact of daylight savings time on NTP time servers. 

In March, clocks in the UK go forward one hour in preparation for British summer time, prompting concerns that daylight savings time will cause problems for users of NTP time servers. In a bid to reassure, Galleon Systems clarifies the impact of daylight savings time on NTP time servers in order to calm such concerns.

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What Time Server Do I Need For My Business?

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

Modern businesses are no longer local. The internet and global communications means that even a small business might have to regularly trade overseas and often across time zones, and this means that accurate time is crucial. On a computer network, virtually every transaction is reliant on time. Time stamps are the only means a computer has of knowing when and if a transaction or process has taken place. Accurate stamps from a time server are required for billing systems, database sorting, network diagnostics and for nearly all transactions conducted over the internet. If any of this applies to your business, perhaps it’s time to ask yourself “What Time Server Do I Need?” (more…)

Understanding your Network Time Server

Friday, May 4th, 2012

They buzz away next to the system’s servers and few people ever give them a moment’s thought, but network time servers are a crucial aspect to any computer network. Understanding their importance is important for maintain a healthy network, as time errors can lead to all sorts of problems, such as security breaches, data loss, or application failure. (more…)

Receiving GPS Time for Network Synchronisation

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

Most of us know how useful the GPS network is. The Global Positioning System has changed the way we navigate on the road, and most modern cars are sold complete with some form of satellite navigation system already installed. However, the Global Positioning System is not only useful for satellite navigation; it has other uses too, especially as a source of accurate time for synchronising a computer network and other such technologies with the aid of a GPS network time server.

Need for Synchronisation

Time synchronisation is vital for all sorts of technologies, especially computer networks. Having different machines with a different time can lead to all sorts of untold problems, from data getting lost to simple things such as emails arriving before they were technically sent. Without accurate synchronisation or a network time server, it is nearly impossible to keep a network running smoothly and pinpoint errors and bugs.

Other technologies too need complete synchronicity. CCTV cameras, cash machines and safety systems such as air traffic control all have to be precisely synchronised. Imagine the chaos if your local cash machine told a different time from the one next to it. In effect, you could withdraw money from one machine, while the one next to it would consider a transaction that hadn’t happened yet, allowing you to withdraw the same amount again.

GPS Time

The Global Positioning System doesn’t actually transmit any positioning information. The reason that satellite navigational systems can work out accurate positioning is due to the time signals that the GPS satellites transmit. Onboard each GPS satellite is a couple of atomic clocks. These clocks transmit their times and exact position of the satellite and it’s this information, triangulated from three or more satellites that a navigational system uses to work out exactly where it is in the world.

Atomic clocks have to be used for this process because the signals are travelling at the speed of light. A one-second inaccuracy in the time signal would lead a satellite navigational system to be in error of over 300,000 km. And it’s a testament to the atomic clocks on GPS satellites that most sat nav systems are accurate to within a few metres.

GPS Network Time Server

Because of the accuracy of the GPS time signals, and the fact that the signal are available anywhere on the planet, the GPS network is ideal for use as a master time source for computer network time synchronisation. To synchronise a computer network or other technology systems to GPS time, all that is required is a GPS network time server.

GPS network time servers do all the work for you. By use of a rooftop antenna, the time server receives the GPS signal and distributes it around a network of machines. By use of time synchronisation protocols such as NTP (Network Time Protocol), all devices can be kept within a few milliseconds of the original GPS time source. And you don’t need multiple time servers for large networks either. A single device can synchronise hundreds of devices to GPS time.

GPS network time servers are simple to install, simple to use and can maintain millisecond accuracy for all sorts of technologies. Used by organisations as diverse as stock exchanges, air traffic control and banking systems, GPS time servers provide an efficient and cost effective solution to maintain network synchronicity.

The Cost of Inaccurate Network Time

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Time is essential to all of us, and losing track of time can be costly. Missing meetings, being late for work or not catching the last bus home can all be a nuisance, but all this pales in comparison to what happens when a computer network loses track of time.

Time is critical for computer systems. It is the only reference a network has for knowing when applications and processes need to be, or have been, done. Alter the network time, allow the clocks to drift or fail to synchronise everything properly and a whole host of problems can arise.

Affects of Time Failure

Firstly, if network time goes wrong, processes and applications due to take place may not happen. This is because if the time is wrong a PC may assume the application has already happened. Secondly, data can easily be lost as timestamps are used in the storing process, and if there is a problem with the time, data may just get dumped. Thirdly, when it comes to debugging a system, without accurate synchronisation it can be nearly impossible. Knowing when something went wrong is essential for any error correction.

Finally, network security is reliant on secure and accurate time. Hackers and malicious software can use any discrepancies in a system’s time to gain access to a network. It only takes a second or two of discrepancy to provide enough access to unauthorised access. And if the time source itself is attacked, the effects can be even more severe

Time Server Security

Many computer networks use online NTP time servers (Network Time Protocol). These are accessed across the internet and send a regular timestamp to which a network synchronises. The problem with these online time server systems is that if the time server is wrong, so the network will be. Also, if a time server itself gets attacked by hackers or malicious software, the effects can be catastrophic. Imagine you network suddenly thinking it’s a year in the future, or in the past, the entire network could be open to all sorts of abuse.

The accuracy of these online time servers can never be guaranteed and are affected by all sorts of things such as the distance away, and the speed of the connection, and they also require an open port in the firewall, through which they send their time signals, and this port could also be used by malicious users.

The NTP Time Server

The solution for ensuring network security is fairly simple and relatively inexpensive – the NTP time server. These dedicated devices receive the time directly from an atomic clock source such as the GPS network (Global Positioning System). This not only makes them highly secure methods of synchronising network time, but also highly accurate, often to within a few milliseconds.

The cost of an NTP server is relatively low, especially when you consider the cost of failing to have accurate and secure network time will cost you. As a single NTP server is able to synchronise a network of hundreds of machines, securely, and offers peace of mind and a cost effective and secure method of keeping your network healthy.