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What is Network Time Protocol (NTP)? A definition & 5 Reasons Why Your Computer Network Needs It

Monday, June 9th, 2014

The importance of Network Time Protocol (NTP) is often underestimated, yet critical systems rely on it every day to function properly. Discover the 5 reasons why your computer network needs NTP.

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What Is NTP Useful For? The 6 Reasons For NTP Time Server Use

Monday, May 12th, 2014

Why is everyone raving about NTP? Because accurate time can safeguard your computer network and improve business efficiency. Discover six valid reasons for NTP time server use.

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Using Ethernet NTP Digital Wall Clocks

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

Accurate time is more crucial now that it has ever been before. While decades ago, having a wall clock a few minutes fast or slow was no big deal, however, in the modern age, with the internet and global communication, knowing the exact time is crucial for all sorts of organisations. Computer networks, for instance, need to be accurately synchronised to enable communication with other networks, and failing to do so can lead to all sorts of potential errors and problems. (more…)

Digital Wall Clocks for Synchronised Time around Hospitals

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Hospitals are large organisations. Hundreds of different health professionals work in the average hospital, and part of the good running and ability to provide care is to ensure good coordination. Because health care is based on multi-disciplinary teams, treatments, meetings, operations and procedures often require strict coordination to prevent wasting time and provide an efficient service. Making sure everybody has access to a synchronised and accurate time is part of this process, which is what makes precise and reliable digital wall clocks for hospitals so important. (more…)

Receiving GPS Time for Network Synchronisation

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

Most of us know how useful the GPS network is. The Global Positioning System has changed the way we navigate on the road, and most modern cars are sold complete with some form of satellite navigation system already installed. However, the Global Positioning System is not only useful for satellite navigation; it has other uses too, especially as a source of accurate time for synchronising a computer network and other such technologies with the aid of a GPS network time server.

Need for Synchronisation

Time synchronisation is vital for all sorts of technologies, especially computer networks. Having different machines with a different time can lead to all sorts of untold problems, from data getting lost to simple things such as emails arriving before they were technically sent. Without accurate synchronisation or a network time server, it is nearly impossible to keep a network running smoothly and pinpoint errors and bugs.

Other technologies too need complete synchronicity. CCTV cameras, cash machines and safety systems such as air traffic control all have to be precisely synchronised. Imagine the chaos if your local cash machine told a different time from the one next to it. In effect, you could withdraw money from one machine, while the one next to it would consider a transaction that hadn’t happened yet, allowing you to withdraw the same amount again.

GPS Time

The Global Positioning System doesn’t actually transmit any positioning information. The reason that satellite navigational systems can work out accurate positioning is due to the time signals that the GPS satellites transmit. Onboard each GPS satellite is a couple of atomic clocks. These clocks transmit their times and exact position of the satellite and it’s this information, triangulated from three or more satellites that a navigational system uses to work out exactly where it is in the world.

Atomic clocks have to be used for this process because the signals are travelling at the speed of light. A one-second inaccuracy in the time signal would lead a satellite navigational system to be in error of over 300,000 km. And it’s a testament to the atomic clocks on GPS satellites that most sat nav systems are accurate to within a few metres.

GPS Network Time Server

Because of the accuracy of the GPS time signals, and the fact that the signal are available anywhere on the planet, the GPS network is ideal for use as a master time source for computer network time synchronisation. To synchronise a computer network or other technology systems to GPS time, all that is required is a GPS network time server.

GPS network time servers do all the work for you. By use of a rooftop antenna, the time server receives the GPS signal and distributes it around a network of machines. By use of time synchronisation protocols such as NTP (Network Time Protocol), all devices can be kept within a few milliseconds of the original GPS time source. And you don’t need multiple time servers for large networks either. A single device can synchronise hundreds of devices to GPS time.

GPS network time servers are simple to install, simple to use and can maintain millisecond accuracy for all sorts of technologies. Used by organisations as diverse as stock exchanges, air traffic control and banking systems, GPS time servers provide an efficient and cost effective solution to maintain network synchronicity.

Importance of Time Synchronisation when Working in the Cloud

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

Cloud computing has been foreseen as being the next big step in the development of information technology with more and more businesses and IT networks becoming cloud reliant and doing away with traditional methods.

The term ‘Cloud Computing’ refers to the use of on demand programs and services online including the storing of information over the internet, and using applications not installed on host machines.

Cloud computing mean that users no longer need to own, install and run software in individual machines, and doesn’t require large capacity storage. It also allows remote computing, enabling users to use the same services, work on the same documents, or access the network at any workstation able to log onto the cloud service.

While these advantages are appealing to businesses enabling them to lower IT costs while providing the same network capabilities, there are disadvantages to cloud computing.

Firstly, to work on the cloud you are reliant on a working network connection. If there is a problem with the line, whether in your locale or with the cloud service provider, you can’t work—even offline.

Secondly, peripherals such as printers and back up drives may not work properly on a cloud-orientated machine, and if you are using a non-specified computer, you won’t be able to access any network hardware unless the specific drivers and software are installed on the machine.

Lack of control is another issue. Being part of a cloud service means that you have to adhere to the terms and conditions of the cloud host, which may affect all sorts of issues such as data ownership and the number of users that can access the system.

Time synchronisation is essential for cloud services, with precise and accurate time needed to ensure that every device that connects to the cloud is logged accurately. Failure to ensure precise time could lead to data getting lost or the wrong version of a job overriding new versions.

To ensure precise time for cloud services, NTP time servers, receiving the time from an atomic clock, are used to maintain accurate and reliable time. A cloud service will essentially be governed by an atomic clock once it is synchronised to an NTP server, so no matter where users are in the world, the cloud service can ensure the correct time is logged preventing data loss and errors.

Galleon NTP server

A New Slim 1U Rackmount Dual Time Server from Galleon Systems

Thursday, June 17th, 2010

Leading providers of time synchronisation equipment and Network Time Protocol Products, Galleon Systems, have released a compact new 1U rackmountable dual time server.

Galleon’s new NTS 6001 1U rackmountable NTP time server can receive atomic clock timing signals from both the Global Positioning System (GPS) and national time and frequency radio transmissions.

Designed to fit snugly into any server rack, the 1U NTS 6001 is a stratum 1 time server capable of symphonizing a network of hundred of machines to within a few
milliseconds of UTC (Coordinated Universal Time).

The NTS 6001 consists of both an integral GPS receiver that can simultaneously track up to 12 satellites, and a high gain radio receiver that can receive the MSF (UK), WWVB (USA) and DCF (Germany) radio transmissions.

The NTS- 6001 dual time server features:

  • NTP Version 4
  • Ethernet NTP output jitter typically within 50 microseconds of UTC.
  • High Reliability – solid state design and convection cooled
  • Easy to use – web based user interface for system configuration and management.
  • Free firmware upgrades.
  • LCD display
  • 3 Year Warranty.

The NTS 6001 is the latest in a long line of highly precise NTP time synchronisation devices from atomic clock experts Galleon Systems.

Manufactured in the UK, Galleon Systems have a wide range of other NTP and time synchronisation devices used worldwide by thousands of organizations who need accurate, reliable and precise time.

For more information please contact:
http://www.galsys.co.uk/
0121 608 4433
sales(at)galleonmail(dot)com

Networking Secrets Synchronization

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

An efficient and error free operation is the goal of any administrator that is setting up a computer network. Ensuring the smooth running and passing of data without errors or loss of connections is a prerequisite for any decent functioning network system.

There are some fundamental things that can be carried out to minimise risk of encountering problems further down the line. A decent network server is a must, as is an efficient router but there is one piece of technology often overlooked in computer networking – the network time server.

The importance of correct computer network time only becomes apparent when something goes wrong. When an error does occur (and without adequate time synchronization it is a matter of when not if) it can be next to impossible to pin down what caused in and where. Just imagine all the error logs on the different machines all with timestamps telling a different time, finding out where and when the error occurred can be near impossible – and that’s before you can even get round to fixing it.

Fortunately most network administrators appreciate the value of synchronization and most ensure the network receives a time signal from across the Internet. However, many administrators are unaware of the vulnerabilities this may cause throughout the network.

By using an online time server, a UDP port (123) needs be kept open which can be an open gate to malicious programs and users. Furthermore, there is no authentication of the online time server so the signal could be hijacked or just be inaccurate.

A dedicated network time server running the protocol NTP (Network Time Protocol) will operate externally to the network and receive the time from an atomic clock source directly (through radio or GPS) making NTP servers, secure, accurate and reliable.

Synchronising Computer Networks to an Atomic Clock

Wednesday, April 1st, 2009

Atomic clocks are well-known for being accurate. Most people may never have seen one but are probably aware that atomic clocks keep highly precise time. In fact modern atomic clock will keep accurate time and not lose a second in one hundred million years.

This amount of precision may seem overkill but a multitude of modern technologies rely on atomic clocks and require such a high level of precision. A perfect example is the satellite navigation systems now found in most auto cars. GPS is reliant on atomic clocks because the satellite signals used in triangulation travel at the speed of light which in a single second can cover nearly 100,000 km.

So it can be seen how some modern technologies rely on this ultra precise timekeeping from atomic clocks but their use doesn’t stop there. Atomic clocks govern the world’s global timescale UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) and they can also be used to synchronise computer networks too.

It may seem extreme to use this nanosecond precision to synchronise computer networks too but as many time sensitive transactions are conducted across the internet with such trades as the stock exchange where prices can fall or rise each and every second it can be seen why atomic clocks are used.

To receive the time from an atomic clock a dedicated NTP server is the most secure and accurate method. These devices receive a time signal broadcast by either atomic clocks from national physics laboratories or direct from the atomic clocks onboard GPS satellites.

By using a dedicated NTP server a computer network will be more secure and as it is synchronised to UTC (the global timescale) it will in effect be synchronised with every other computer network using a NTP server.

The Body Clock Natures Own NTP Server

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Developing new methods of telling the time accurately and precisely has developed to a new obsession amongst chronologists in the twenty first century. Since the development of the first atomic clocks in the 1950’s with millisecond accuracy the race was started with organisation such as the US’s NIST (National Institute for Standards and Time) and the UK’s NPL (National Physical Laboratory) developing increasingly accurate atomic clocks.

Atomic clocks are used as the time source for high technologies and applications such as satellite navigation and air traffic control, they are also the source for time signals used by NTP servers to synchronise computer networks.

An NTP server works by continually adjusting the computers system clock to ensure it matches the time relayed by the atomic clock. In doing this the NTP server can keep a computer network to within a few milliseconds of atomic clock controlled UTC (Coordinated Universal Time).

However, as remarkable this technology may seem it appears Mother Nature has already been doing the very same thing with our own body clocks.

The human body clock is only just being understood by medical science (the study of which is called Chronobiology) but what is known is that the body clock extremely important in the functioning of our day to day lives; it is also highly accurate and works in a very similar way to the NTP server.

Whilst a NTP time server receives a time signal from an atomic clock and adjust the system clocks on computers to match, our body clocks do the very same thing. The body clock runs in a circadian rhythm in other words a 24 hour clock. When the sun rises in the morning part of the brain that governs the body clock called the suprachiasmatic nucleus – which is located in the brain’s hypothalamus, automatically corrects for the sun’s movement.

In this way the human body clock adjusts for the darker winters and lighter months of the summer which is why you may find it more difficult to wake in the winter. The body clock adjusts itself every day to ensure it is synchronised to the rotation of the sun just as a NTP time server synchronises a computer’s system clock to ensure it is running accurately  to its timing source – the atomic clock.